Staph, MRSA, in Milk….


I have it, I live with it. But then damn near everyone of us whom works or has worked in Heath care has been exposed to it.
Scary shit is what it is..

EDIS Number: BH-20121226-37632-GBR
Date / time: 26/12/2012 03:55:44 [UTC]
Event: Biological Hazard
Area: Europe
Country: United Kingdom
State/County:
Location: [Statewide]
Number of Deads: N/A
Number of Injured: N/A
Number of Infected: N/A
Number of Missing: N/A
Number of Affected: N/A
Number of Evacuated: N/A
Damage level: N/A

Description:

A new strain of MRSA has been found in British milk, indicating that the superbug is spreading through the livestock population and poses a growing threat to human health. The new strain, MRSA ST398, has been identified in seven samples of bulk milk from five different farms in England. The discovery, from tests on 1,500 samples, indicates that antibiotic-resistant organisms are gaining an increasing hold in the dairy industry. The disclosure comes amid growing concern over the use of modern antibiotics on British farms, driven by price pressure imposed by the big supermarket chains. Intensive farming with thousands of animals raised in cramped conditions means infections spread faster and the need for antibiotics is consequently greater. Three classes of antibiotics rated as "critically important to human medicine" by the World Health Organisation - cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and macrolides - have increased in use in the animal population by eightfold in the last decade.

The more antibiotics are used, the greater the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as MRSA, will evolve. Experts say there is no risk of MRSA infection to consumers of milk or dairy products so long as the milk is pasteurised. The risk comes from farmworkers, vets and abattoir workers, who may become infected through contact with livestock and transmit the bug to others. The discovery was made by scientists from Cambridge University who first identified MRSA in milk in 2011. They say the latest finding of a different strain is worrying. Mark Holmes, of the department of veterinary medicine, who led the study, published in Eurosurveillance, said: "This is definitely a worsening situation. In 2011 when we first found MRSA in farm animals, the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs [Defra] initially didn't believe it. They said we don't have MRSA in the dairy industry in this country."

"Now we definitely have MRSA in livestock. What is curious is that it has turned up in dairy cows when in other countries on the Continent it is principally in pigs. Could it be in pigs or poultry in this country? We don't know." The MRSA superbug can cause serious infections in humans which are difficult to treat, require stronger antibiotics, and take longer to resolve. Human cases of infection with the new strain have been found in Scotland and northern England according to Defra, but no details are available. Dr Holmes said supermarket pressure on farmers to hold down prices was leading to the overuse of antibiotics to prevent cattle getting mastitis, an infection of the udder, that might interrupt the milk supply. "If farmers were not screwed into the ground by the supermarkets and allowed to get a fair price for their milk they would be able to use fewer antibiotics," he said.

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One thought on “Staph, MRSA, in Milk….”

  1. It’s surprising to me that MRSA has not shown up sooner in milk. Antibiotics have been used for quite a while on crowded industrial farms. This creates the perfect conditions for antibiotic resistant superbugs like MRSA to develop. Personally, I refuse to eat any dairy or meat products that are raised in such unhealthy conditions. Sure, industrial farms keep the prices down, but It underscores the importance of making informed decisions about the quality of the foods we eat and the hidden costs to our health for eating “cheap” foods. A much better, though slightly more expensive option, is pasture raised organic milk.

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