Tag Archives: Judas Iscariot

The Judas Test

The Judas Test

February 28

If an enemy were insulting me, I could endure it; if a foe were raising himself against me, I could hide from him. But it is you, a man like myself, my companion, my close friend, with whom I once enjoyed sweet fellowship as we walked with the throng at the house of God (Ps. 55:12-14).

Betrayal is one of the most difficult tests that we will ever face because it involves being wounded by someone we trust. It’s hard not to become bitter when a friend or family member wounds us. It takes a lot of Christ-like grace to forgive a traitor.

You have probably faced the Judas Test yourself. Everyday you and I work in a marketplace that is rife with betrayal, deception, duplicity, and treachery. Perhaps you have been betrayed by your boss or a coworker. Or perhaps somebody betrayed a confidence or stabbed you in the back. It may have even been someone you’ve gone to church with or prayed with – someone you trusted as a brother in Christ.

The Judas kiss stings worse than a slap across the face. Almost every leader I know has experienced that sting at one time or another. Yet God is watching to see how we respond to the Judas Test. If we pass the test, He can then take us to the next level, the next test. If we fail, we’ll probably have to repeat the test until we learn to forgive.

The Judas Test is God’s graduate level course in faith, designed to reveal the truth about ourselves: Are we willing to trust Him enough to forgive the Judases in our lives? The book of Hebrews warns, “See to it that no one misses the grace of God and that no bitter root grows up to cause trouble and defile many” (Heb 12:15). When we refuse to forgive we risk infecting others with a “bitter root” of resentment.

A Prophet without Honor

A Prophet without Honor

November 30

“Where did this man get these things? And what wisdom is this which is given to Him, that such mighty works are performed by His hands? Is this not the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, Joses, Judas, and Simon? A prophet is not without honor except in his own country, among his own relatives, and in his own house” (Mark 6.3, 4).

Have you ever noticed how difficult it can be to spiritually impact your immediate circle of relationships and family? Jesus warned us of this phenomenon. We often relate to family and friends differently because they have a history with us that no one else has. They most likely have not had the privilege to witness the spiritual transformation that you have experienced and is evidenced by others in your life.

The spiritual authority that others may recognize in you is not there with your own family and friends. “After all, you’re just my sister or brother, with whom I fought, played, and lived everyday life,” is what is thought. Jesus was more qualified to be a carpenter than the Son of God in his own family and community’s eyes. It was too difficult to change old perceptions of someone they knew so well. So too, is it for your family members.

The sad result of this mindset is that we often do not experience the same fruit of ministry in our family’s lives that we do outside this circle. It is an unfortunate truth. “Jesus still healed a few sick people,” meaning there is still a remnant of faith that can receive from you and I. Ultimately, God determines the fruit of our lives. Do not allow spiritual pride to prevent you from freely giving to your family and friends when they do not receive you in the way you think they should. You don’t know which “few” God will choose to touch through your life.

Many did not receive Jesus. Therefore, many will not receive you. Nevertheless, allow God to touch the few in your circle He chooses to touch through you.